The Neanderthal Post

Survival of the Blog

It’s Not Going To Be OK

By Jon Skindzier  AskMen.com

If you’re one of those guys still lounging around and waiting for life to happen, consider this: By 35, many of the world’s great men weren’t just working on groundbreaking masterpieces, they’d finished them. Christopher Marlowe had inspired Shakespeare, and died, by the time he was 29; F. Scott Fitzgerald had written The Great Gatsby by 29; and Orson Welles wrote, directed and starred in what’s often considered the greatest film ever made at the doe-eyed age of 25.

In Welles’ day, most of us would have been married with kids by our mid-20s. Popular culture wants to convince us that we can remain young indefinitely (usually through buying things), but 30 is not the new 20 — 30 is 30. If you aren’t well on your way to what you really want to do with your life, you need to start yesterday. It’s not going to be OK unless you get off your ass and start doing something — now.

You are not going to stumble into your dream job

Your current job — what you’re doing right now — is your career and your identity. Does that thought satisfy you? If you took your current title and slapped it on a business card, would you be happy handing that thing out to hot girls, aware that they’d think that’s what you are as a person?

Careers take work. Dreams take even more. Malcolm Gladwell (a Canadian journalist) suggests that it takes 10,000 hours of practice to master something, and that “genius” is as much effort as it is talent. Mozart wasn’t some god-child; he was just a kid who practiced his ass off until music was his language. The same thing applies to your future — you can’t expect to succeed if you’re just yawning your way through life with vague, distant dreams. It’s not going to be OK if that’s your approach.

Make it OK: Get to work at maximizing each day and becoming the dude you envision yourself to be now. You’re never going to get to where you want to be if you’re treating your goals like a halfhearted hobby.

Your dream girl will not just roll up and find you

Romantic comedies hinge on two people just wandering into a meaningful relationship. Sitcoms tell us we’ll be right down the hall from gorgeous chicks who will love us for our quirkiness.

These are fiction. These situations do not just happen, and it’s not going to be OK if you think they do. Most guys do get married, but a lot of them wind up on the business end of a shotgun wedding because somebody got pregnant. If you’re leaving your love life up to chance, hoping for destiny to settle things, you’re delusional. You can either put real effort into meeting someone you’ll be thrilled with, or you can flounder between crappy relationships until you’re suddenly the only unmarried guy you know.

Make it OK: Meet people, preferably by going someplace where women are, someplace you actually enjoy. Don’t go to yoga for the chicks if you hate yoga — start with being genuine and confident, and work from there.

We have a few more signs it’s not going to be OK and how you can make it OK by doing something about it

You’re not going to get rich overnight

Outside of winning the lottery (odds: slightly less than being hit by lightning) or just being rich to begin with, wealthy guys have money because they invested or saved. Wealth won’t just fall into your lap, and you won’t just automatically make more money in the future as a matter of course.

According to the 2009 Great Male Survey, 78% of you would only really feel comfortable retiring on a $1 million nest egg. The most important thing is that you don’t see the word “retiring” and assume we’re talking to some old guy — this is what you should be doing.

Make it OK: If you save $4,000 a year at 7%, you’ll wind up with more than twice as much cash at retirement age if you start by 30 instead of 40. So start. Set up an automatic savings plan. Seek out, and care about, financial advice.

Your health doesn’t come with a guarantee

Your body and your brain pretty much quit improving somewhere around age 20. Every year after that, it gets harder to even stay the same, much less to make radical, positive changes. And it’s only going to get harder tomorrow for you to run a mile or bike up a hill than it already is today. Work on the stuff you actually can fix, before you’re saddled with the inevitable stuff (i.e., thinning hair and a slowing metabolism).

Make it OK: Find a gym, or get back to one. Go to your doctor, and your dentist. Quit drinking like you’re 21. Your body remembers your excesses, and will punish you for them.

Don’t leave life to chance

If you think about midlife crises at all, you probably picture some trivial old-guy desperation that happens to other people. But not seeing them coming is what causes them — they’re the sudden realization that youth is irretrievably gone, and you’re more prone to that dawning shock if you’re idling through life and trusting your future to chance. 

January 3, 2010 Posted by | Dating/Sex, Dining/Living, Humor | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Ron Muech – Hyper Realist Sculptor

There is a point, when sculpturing, at witch taking great care of details leads to creating hyper realistic artwork that cannot be set apart from the real world objects it is supposed to represent. Ron Muech sculptures are just that, extraordinary realistic work that seems real even after looking at it for the tenth time. 

Ron Mueck was born on 1958 is an Australian hyper realist sculptor working in Great Britain. Mueck’s early career was as a model maker and puppeteer for children’s television and films, notably the film Labyrinth for which he also contributed the voice of Ludo.   Mueck moved on to establish his own company in London, making photo-realistic props and animatronics for the advertising industry.   Although highly detailed, these props were usually designed to be photographed from one specific angle hiding the mess of construction seen from the other side. Mueck increasingly wanted to produce realistic sculptures which looked perfect from all angles.

In 1996 Mueck transitioned to fine art, collaborating with his mother-in-law, Paula Rego, to produce small figures as part of a tableau she was showing at the Hayward Gallery. Rego introduced him to Charles Saatchi who was immediately impressed and started to collect and commission work.   This led to the piece which made Mueck’s name, Dead Dad, being included in the Sensation show at the Royal Academy the following year. Dead Dad is a rather haunting silicone and mixed media sculpture of the corpse of Mueck’s father reduced to about two thirds of its natural scale. It is the only work of Mueck’s that uses his own hair for the finished product.   Mueck’s sculptures faithfully reproduce the minute detail of the human body, but play with scale to produce disconcertingly jarring visual images. His five metre high sculpture Boy 1999 was a feature in the Millennium Dome and later exhibited in the Venice Biennale.   In 2002 his sculpture Pregnant Woman was purchased by the National Gallery of Australia for $800,000.

***************Continue viewing all the pictures…

December 20, 2009 Posted by | Art/Culture, News | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Are You Persistent Or Just Stubborn?

by Russell Bishop

Last week, we took on the notion of resistance, stating that what you resist, you are stuck with. All kinds of comments came in, ranging from agreement, to disagreement, to those who wanted me to know that other people have said something similar before me.

A good question arose, however. What’s the difference between resistance and persistence? And where does being stubborn fit in?

How do you know if you are being persistent or just stubborn?

There’s an old story about Thomas Edison and the light bulb, a story which may or may not be true. However, the point of the story will probably resonate.

On the way to light bulb, Edison experimented with thousands of different filaments before he settled on a carbon filament that would last for hours. Once the light bulb became somewhat available, the story goes that he was interviewed by a science editor for a major publication. The editor asked Edison how it felt to have failed so many times with the thousands of previous filament experiments. Edison replied something like, “Fail? I give you light bulb!” The editor stubbornly persisted, “but look at all your failures along the way!” To which Edison simply pointed out, “The light bulb had thousands of steps to it along the way. Had I viewed the previous steps as failures, I never would have wound up with light bulb. I just didn’t know how many steps there were before we would wind up with light bulb.”

Again, who knows if the story is true or not. But the point is still quite valid.

Lao-tzu said, “A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.” I like to say that he left out an important element: “a thousand mile journey takes all the steps it takes.”

Continue reading…

December 14, 2009 Posted by | News | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Chinese Flower Children Beat Up Couple Who Refuse To Buy Their Flowers

There are children in China who try to sell flowers to couples exiting from nightclubs, bars, or are just walking along busy streets. They are very persistent and sometimes will wrap themselves around your legs so you cannot leave until you buy their flowers. Many believe behind the scenes are adults who organize and control these children as a business. This recently popular video, filmed i More..n Ningbo, China on the cheng huang miao [city god temple] street, a physical fight happens between a young post-80s generation couple and the post-00s generation street children

November 25, 2009 Posted by | News | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment